A Brief Insight on the Evolution of the BMW S1000RR

Almost 30 years of development to achieve a 207hp and 305kph street-legal superbike

The video comes from Free Wheelie and covers 28 years of superbike development. It all started with the 1992 BMW R1100RS making 90 hp from its boxer engine and the motorcycle evolved into the track-focused superbikes like the limited edition HP4 Race and the latest generation S1000RR launched last year which makes 207hp and a top speed of 305 kph.

 

BMW R1100RS was fitted with a 1085cc air-cooled boxer engine making 90hp and 95 Nm (70 lb.-ft) of torque. Even the top speed was normal considering the modern-day track machines - 218 kph (135 mph). It weighed 239 kg (527 pounds) and featured a five-speed manual transmission with a shaft final drive.

The motorcycle was replaced in ‘98 with the R1100S model which came along with a slight increase in power and torque. It delivered 98 hp, 97 Nm ( 71 lb.-ft) of torque and reached a top speed of 227 kph (141 mph). The new model was slimmer with a weight of 208 kg (458 pounds) while the bodywork was more sport-focused.

Its bigger brother was launched in 2006 in the form of the R1200S. This time around the bike had an increase in engine size, a new 1170cc boxer making 122hp and 112Nm (82 lb.-ft) of torque. All this power was enough to help the bike reach a top speed of 241 kph (under 150 mph) while the weight sat at 198 kg (436 pounds).

Two years later, BMW introduced the HP2 Sport. Now, the 1170cc boxer engine developed 138 hp and a maximum torque level of 115 Nm (85 lb-ft). It was the third model of the HP range. The motorcycle had a top speed of 248 kph (154 mph) while the weight sat at 178 kg (392 pounds). These figures helped BMW to make a decision and develop the first generation of the S1000RR superbike.

BMW S1000RR

Back in 2009, BMW launched the S1000RR model. They’ve ditched the boxer engine in favour of a 999cc inline-four configuration which had an output of 193 hp and a maximum torque of 112 Nm (82 lb-ft). The claimed top speed was 305 kph (just a slight under 190 mph). The motorcycle featured a dry weight of 183 kg (403 pounds) and it featured electronics like Race ABS, DTC, and a couple of rider aids.

Three years later, the model was upgraded and in 2015 a new generation was launched featuring 199hp, 310 kph (194 mph) top speed and a dry weight of 175 kg (386 pounds). Also, it had a new frame and geometry, pit lane limiter like a MotoGP bike, cruise control and launch control.



BMW HP4 Race

Moving two years later, BMW launched the track only HP4 Race boosting 212 hp, a top speed of 312 kph (195 mph) while the weight dropped to 146 kg (322 pounds). It has featured a carbon fibre frame, carbon wheels and a carbon fibre bodywork which made the bike lighter than the factory World Superbike Championship bikes. It was a limited edition of just 750 units.

BMW S1000RR – the latest generation

Last year the German manufacturer unveiled the latest generation S1000RR. It’s fitted with the 999cc inline-four, this time making 207 hp and 112 Nm (82 lb-ft) of torque. Top speed is set at 305 kph (190 mph). 

The superbike features the new variable valve timing system based on the R1250 range Shiftcam technology which allows seamless adjustment of valve lift for enhanced efficiency and reduced emissions. Moreover, the bike is faster and easier to ride on track compared to its predecessor. 

The S1000RR has a dry weight of 171 kg (377 pounds) while the electronic package includes partly-integral ABS as standard and has an option to be switched off, different riding modes, Gear Shift Assist Pro and an option to add the M package. This was the bike has track-focused electronic aids, such as DTC +/- Shift, ABS Settings, engine mappings, wheelie and slide control to name a few.



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