The Street-Legal Moto2. Make room for the new Triumph Daytona 765

Triumph is building a street bike around the new Moto2 engine

It’s been quite a long time since Triumph left aside their iconic Daytona. Fortunately, the waiting comes to an end sooner than we expected, as the first spy-shots with the new Daytona 765 were caught by the folks at MCN. The pictures were published on this week's issue. 

The base ground for the new 765 sports bike will be the three-cylinder engine that Triumph developed last year for the Moto2 prototypes. The new powerplant is able to produce 135 horsepower and can be tuned for even more, while meeting event the Euro 5 emission regulations. 

The new Daytona will be equipped with all the latest electronics on the market, making it a key player in the middleweight sports bike class. The list will include traction control, riding modes, cornering ABS, quickshifter and autoblipper as standard. We already experienced the 2018 Triumph Street Triple that uses the same 765 engine. We noticed at that time that the most impressive perk of this new engine is the power delivery that feels present throughout the whole rev range.

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The looks of the new Daytona 765 are not very far from the old model. The slim body and aggressive lines are still here meaning the weight will remain as low as possible. The weight figure will probably stand under 180 kg making the new Daytona one of the lightest supersport motorcycles on the market. The main rivals for the new Triumph are the Kawasaki ZX-6R and the Yamaha YZF R6 that proved to be favourites for this segment.

Check out our test ride with the Triumph Street Triple 765 in the window below or directly on our YouTube Channel.

The Triumph Daytona 675 was the first supersport triple made by Triumph and replaced the four-cylinder Daytona 650. The production came to an end in 2016 (2017 for the R model), due to the low demand for the middleweight sports motorcycles and the tough European emission standards. The same low demand - strict regulation combo killed another legendary name - the Honda CBR600RR - probably the most popular middleweight sports bike on the market.

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